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As a followup to my previous post, I wrote a script to generate the master list of journal names and their abbreviations from Web of Science. The script is designed to be used in conjunction with the previous one, and is also written in perl (which I’m still learning) and can be downloaded here or viewed here. Improvements and suggestions welcome. At the bottom of the script is a list of my custom journal names and abbreviations.

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UPDATE: I just posted an update. This feature is coming soon to Mendeley! Several journals require abbreviated journal names, but as of yet Mendeley doesn’t make this possible. Or so I thought. After coming across this blog post I decided to try to get this functionality working on my computers. To summarize, you can get Mendeley to read in a list of abbreviated journal names by: creating a folder inside the Mendeley data directory called ‘journalAbbreviations’; placing a formatted text file named ‘default.

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I came across this incredibly useful site today:

http://csleditor.quist.de/csleditor/show/1/example-citation-style

No longer need to manually edit custom citation style (CSL) files for Mendeley (and Zotero) within a text file!!!

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Ever been writing a document in [latex]\LaTeX[/latex] and had to look up the code for a particular symbol? Google usually directs me to the Comprehesive LaTeX Symbol List but scrolling through and finding the symbol I’m looking for is time consuming. However, today I came across this site (Detexify) which lets you draw the symbol you are looking for and it tries to match it, providing symbol suggestions and letting you know the [latex]\LaTeX[/latex] code and the package to use!

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I was looking for a good way to draw pedigrees using software, without having to fuss drawing them “by hand” using a drawing program. Lo and behold, I came across a few different packages in R that allow me to do just that! Using the kinship2 package, I was quickly able to produce a nice pedigree for a family with two genetic conditions: factor VIII deficiency (haemophilia) and myotonic dystrophy.

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I’m an avid user of Mendeley citation management software (CMS), and am pleased with the capabilities of this cross-platform, open-source, and *free* referencing tool. However, one limitation I’ve encountered is that it does not have very many citiation styles preinstalled, and although many additional formats are available to download through the Mendeley interface, it does not (yet) provide a built-in style editor to customize citiation styles. Fortunately, Mendeley uses Citation Style Language v1.

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Backstory I recently taught a senior-level population dynamics course, and had to decide how best to get my students to be able to play around with the various models we were exploring in class. I ruled out using Excel right away and thought about using Mathematica because of its wonderful plotting capabilities and relatively-easy to learn syntax. However, I felt that it would be more trouble that it was worth to try to get either a site license for the students to be able to use the computers at school, as I had ruled out asking the students to purchase their own student copies.

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